ASCO 2015: African Americans Prone to Display Negative Perceptions of Cancer-Related Clinical Trials

ASCO 2015: African Americans Prone to Display Negative Perceptions of Cancer-Related Clinical Trials

By Jo Cavallo

also SEE POST ON BOOK SITE CANCER AWARENESS ALL SHOULD HAVE REGARDING MINORITIES

http://www.whentumoristherumorandcanceristheanswer.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/CANCER-AWARENESS-ALL-SHOULD-HAVE-REGARDING-MINORITIES.pdf

WWW.WHENTUMORISTHERUMORANDCANCERISTHEANSWER.COM/  (BOOK SITE UNDER CONTENT )

ASCO POST
Key Points:

  • Of the patients surveyed, 54% had not enrolled in a clinical trial within the past 9 months.
  • Participants believed their doctors had provided enough information about clinical trial involvement, that benefits would outweigh risks, and that this option was the best treatment for their cancer.
  • Nonparticipants believed that a clinical trial would make them sicker and that important information would be withheld and reported no one spoke with them about participation.

African American patients have a disproportionately high rate of cancer and yet are less likely than Caucasian patients to participate in oncologic clinical trials that can significantly improve quality of life. Researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center and Temple University explored the differences between African Americans who did and did not participate in a clinical trial and found significant discrepancies in perceptions and beliefs between the two groups. Lead study author Daniel M. Geynisman, MD, Attending Physician and Assistant Professor of Medical Oncology at Fox Chase, presented these findings on June 1 at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago (Abstract 6550).

Study Background

Dr. Geynisman and colleagues conducted a perceptual mapping survey of adult African American cancer patients at two American cancer centers. The patients were asked to report how much they agreed or disagreed on a 0–10 scale (0 = strongly disagree, 10 = strongly agree) regarding items such as clinical trials’ benefits, barriers, and value, as well as information on the amount of support they’ve received from individuals around them and their beliefs about health-care providers. This is the second of a three-phase study.

“We spoke to African American patients who both participated and did not participate in clinical trials to find out particular reasons why each group chose a different path,” Dr. Geynisman said. “As it turned out, there were a number of significant differences between those who did and did not participate in a trial. The development of targeted tools to help address some of those differences should be the next step.”

A Sharp Divide

For the 41 patients (mean age, 60 years), 54% had not enrolled in a clinical trial within the past 9 months. The researchers found that those individuals who participated in clinical trials more strongly agreed that their doctor had provided enough information to make a decision about their clinical trial involvement. They also more strongly believed the benefits outweighed the possible adverse effects and that trials offered the best available treatment for cancer. Nonparticipants believed that a clinical trial would make them sicker and that important information would be withheld and reported no one spoke with them about participation.

As a result, the researchers indicated that greater attention needs to be given to negative perceptions regarding clinical trials, and it is important that all African American cancer patients receive detailed information regarding their treatment options. As a result, this group will likely see better outcomes from their treatment. “It is crucial to understand the obstacles African Americans face in taking part in oncologic clinical trials, so that effective interventions can be developed,” Dr. Geynisman said.

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